+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Tree trunks don't grow up

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    poultney vermont
    Posts
    790

    Default Tree trunks don't grow up

    Pulling last few hundred taps today and always think of what may have caused this, all other tree's the fence has stayed at normal height. I've always heard a fence in a tree will always stay at that height, and usually seems to. Any thoughts here?

    Is about 8 feet off the ground.....16189331200001339337180.jpg
    18x30 sugarshack
    5100 taps high vac
    3x10 inferno with steampan
    7'' wes fab filter press
    10'' cdl air filter press
    D&G 1000 with recirculation

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Potsdam in far northern New York
    Posts
    765

    Default

    My only thought is that they built that fence over a deep snow drift or brush pile. I can remember tapping one year in really deep snow, and taking down the lines later cause they were 6 or 7 feet off the ground.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    poultney vermont
    Posts
    790

    Default

    Perhaps the ground level has changed or snow. I've wondered about this for probably 8 years now!! Hard to say I guess my thoughts are this tree is different than most in way it grew. Perhaps this particular tree did grow upwards. Not sure.

    I've always wanted to post a pic of it and finally had phone on me.

    Be interesting to see other pics of things you don't see everyday
    18x30 sugarshack
    5100 taps high vac
    3x10 inferno with steampan
    7'' wes fab filter press
    10'' cdl air filter press
    D&G 1000 with recirculation

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Center, Underhill Ctr, VT
    Posts
    5,579

    Default

    Can't really see much in the photo. Is there barbed wire going through that horizontal wound?

    Regardless, you are correct. Tree STEMS do not grow upward like grasses do. The grow in areas called "meristems." They do grow outward (extension) at the tips of buds and roots, but once there is "wood", any growth is in girth -- that is outwardly, due to cambial growth.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    poultney vermont
    Posts
    790

    Default

    Yes, It's a length of barbed wire coming out of the wound, it's approximately 8' up off the ground.

    I guess there must be a reason for this, but it does seem as the tree trunk grew upwards.

    The only other thing I can think of is the tree was bent over or driven over by tractor, the fence was attached, and then the tree straightened back out but if the tree was large enough to support a fencing staple it would be hard to believe that tree could bend over and then straighten back out.
    18x30 sugarshack
    5100 taps high vac
    3x10 inferno with steampan
    7'' wes fab filter press
    10'' cdl air filter press
    D&G 1000 with recirculation

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Stockbridge,Ma
    Posts
    213

    Default

    My guess is that they needed to access the land on the other side of the fence without cutting it so they lifted and tacked it up there but never lowered it back down. Same as when I am working in one of my sugarbushes. I will prop up a sap line with a cut off sapling so I can get around with my equipment.
    First introduced to making maple syrup in 1969
    Making syrup every year since 1979
    3 x 10 oil fired
    Revolution syrup and max flue pan
    About 1300 taps on gravity, vacuum someday
    Bought first Marcland drawoff in 1997, still going strong.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    poultney vermont
    Posts
    790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bill m View Post
    My guess is that they needed to access the land on the other side of the fence without cutting it so they lifted and tacked it up there but never lowered it back down. Same as when I am working in one of my sugarbushes. I will prop up a sap line with a cut off sapling so I can get around with my equipment.
    There it is! Very good possibility that I never once thought of, pretty likely what happened as I think about it. This property was a Sugarbush 50-70 years ago and most non maple have been cut, perhaps on last trip they never stopped to lower fence back down.....
    18x30 sugarshack
    5100 taps high vac
    3x10 inferno with steampan
    7'' wes fab filter press
    10'' cdl air filter press
    D&G 1000 with recirculation

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Covington Twp. Pa.
    Posts
    497

    Default

    I have 4 Maples trees in my back yard that are growing in a square. I built a large treehouse (sleeps 4) 11 feet above ground on 2x12s. Each was lag bolted on one end and resting on J brackets on the end so it could slide with the movement of the trees in high winds. A few years went by with no problems. Then one of the trees died. I cut the top of the tree off at the height of the middle of the treehouse keeping the dead tree standing to support the treehouse. After a few years we noticed that the door was hard to close. Right now it is almost impossible. The whole treehouse is now out of wack and the door frame is no longer square and plumb! Viewing the front deck of the treehouse from a distance it is obvious that the side attached to the dead tree is much lower than the other side. ( I haven't measured it but I am sure it is at least 3-4 inches difference) I also have a set of stairs attached to the side that has landing on the way up. The stairs are also no longer sitting level as the rise of the trees has pulled the steps up and pulled the landing closer to the treehouse leaving the lower set of steps tilted. I beg to differ that trees do not grow upwards!
    2x3 Patrick Phaneuf pan
    Homemade arch
    100+ taps
    Sugar Shack in future
    Wife into it as much as me
    Also do homebrew

    http://s928.photobucket.com/albums/ad121/ZMANSYRUP/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
    Posts
    995

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Z/MAN View Post
    I have 4 Maples trees in my back yard that are growing in a square. I built a large treehouse (sleeps 4) 11 feet above ground on 2x12s. Each was lag bolted on one end and resting on J brackets on the end so it could slide with the movement of the trees in high winds. A few years went by with no problems. Then one of the trees died. I cut the top of the tree off at the height of the middle of the treehouse keeping the dead tree standing to support the treehouse. After a few years we noticed that the door was hard to close. Right now it is almost impossible. The whole treehouse is now out of wack and the door frame is no longer square and plumb! Viewing the front deck of the treehouse from a distance it is obvious that the side attached to the dead tree is much lower than the other side. ( I haven't measured it but I am sure it is at least 3-4 inches difference) I also have a set of stairs attached to the side that has landing on the way up. The stairs are also no longer sitting level as the rise of the trees has pulled the steps up and pulled the landing closer to the treehouse leaving the lower set of steps tilted. I beg to differ that trees do not grow upwards!
    Your issue may be the drying out of the dead tree and thus having shrinkage and pulling that portion down some.
    Smoky Lake 2x6 dropflu pans and hoods on homemade arch
    Smoky Lake 6 gallon water jacked bottler
    Concentric Exhaust
    250 Deer Run RO
    325 taps

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Center, Underhill Ctr, VT
    Posts
    5,579

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Super Sapper View Post
    Your issue may be the drying out of the dead tree and thus having shrinkage and pulling that portion down some.
    This is the most likely explanation. Live trees do not grow up (meaning that a point on the stem of a tree will not move upward over time).

    Trees have apical meristems (growth zones) at the tips (buds) of branches and at roots. These grow outward from the tips, but extension is limited to only a short distance over a fairly period of time (one growing season) before new buds take over the next year.

    They also have radial meristems (cambium) where they grow outward (in girth) by putting on new xylem (sapwood) and new phloem (inner bark, where sugars flow in the summer period).

    Some other types of plants, like grasses, have basal (bottom) meristems, which grow from the base, which is why you can cut the top off and it'll just keep growing back. This is an adaption to grazing by animals.

    What you're likely seeing with your treehouse is shrinkage of the wood in the stem as the tree has dried out over time and settling of the tree as the roots die, decay, and shrink.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts