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Thread: Quick question on filtering and bottling

  1. #1
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    Default Quick question on filtering and bottling

    So the general consensus from the studying I’ve been doing is; run syrup through filter during draw off, then reheat and bottle.

    My question is:

    Wouldn’t reheating just cause more sugar sand to develop? Then you’d have to filter again right? Then it would get cold... so you’d have to heat it up again! Also you’d boil your sap too thick?

    Just seems like it could easily turn in to an insane cycle of filtering and reheating/adding more sap to dilute!

    Maybe I’m just over thinking it.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
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    I was new to the filter press and bottler last season. It works fine to filter, then get back up to temp and bottle. I think most say not to go over 185 but we consistently went up to 190 with no issues. No mold, no niter, nothing.
    March 2011- my brain had a weird spark
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  3. #3
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    Okay, thank you!

  4. #4
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    Keep your reheat temp under 200 Degrees and you are good! We always bottle between 180 and 195 degrees!
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  5. #5
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    central NH
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    We use a water jacket bottler. After filtering. Bring it to 190. No hot spots to create niter.
    Steve

    2017
    2x8 Mason drop tube evaporator
    420 Taps
    3 surflo pumps on 5/16
    79 gallons of syrup made
    2016
    New kitchen addition to sap house
    400 taps
    52 gallons syrup made

  6. #6
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    I also filter, then send it to my Water Jacketed bottler. There it is brought up to 186-188 and bottled. The syrup never gets cloudy. If you bottle using any method that reheats the syrup by direct heat (flame, electric burner or such) it can get hot spots and even with the overall temperature correct, that spot over the heat can and often does form more niter. If you dispense into bottles, don't stir of do anything that will disturb that area of the canner and you will be OK until it gets very low on syrup. Then, if still in the season, dump it back into the next batch, if the end of the season, use that for home use.
    Dave Klish about 400 taps, down from much more. Retired from collecting and boiling in 2021. Mostly because of a bad hip.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by KJamesJR View Post
    So the general consensus from the studying I’ve been doing is; run syrup through filter during draw off, then reheat and bottle.
    That will work if you are at the correct density when you are drawing off, and reheating with a method that doesn't create more niter such as a steam or water jacketed bottler.

    Many of us use a finishing pan of some kind to get the correct density, then run the syrup through the filters into a bottler of some kind that keeps syrup at the correct bottling temp
    Noel Good
    1998 to 2009: 15 taps on buckets, scavenged fire pit and pans
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by wnybassman View Post
    That will work if you are at the correct density when you are drawing off, and reheating with a method that doesn't create more niter such as a steam or water jacketed bottler.

    Many of us use a finishing pan of some kind to get the correct density, then run the syrup through the filters into a bottler of some kind that keeps syrup at the correct bottling temp
    My goal is to draw off at the correct density, filter (through a cone), then reheat in a SS stock pot and bottle inside the house. I was just trying to wrap my head around when to filter because there seems to be a preference. Some would say to filter every time you move the sap

    Last year I was filtering after a batch boil, then bringing inside for finishing, then filter again, then heat back up and bottle but I was still getting granulars in the syrup... I also was only using cheese clothes and syrup pre-filters. I thought the pre filters were just "disposable" synthetic filters... Yeah, I'm new.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by maple flats View Post
    I also filter, then send it to my Water Jacketed bottler. There it is brought up to 186-188 and bottled. The syrup never gets cloudy. If you bottle using any method that reheats the syrup by direct heat (flame, electric burner or such) it can get hot spots and even with the overall temperature correct, that spot over the heat can and often does form more niter. If you dispense into bottles, don't stir of do anything that will disturb that area of the canner and you will be OK until it gets very low on syrup. Then, if still in the season, dump it back into the next batch, if the end of the season, use that for home use.
    How logical would it be to use a propane cook stove? Those bottles are a little overkill for my operation.

    If you keep the syrup agitated as it's re-heating (before hot spots occur) will that prevent the hot spots completely or should we just not stir it at all?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    central NH
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    Where about are you in NH? Our sugar shack is in Epsom. I can show you our setup with the water jacket flat filter bottler. Any kind of direct heat source will create a hot spot. Gas, electric. Without a separation of water/steam to disperse the heat evenly. We draw off at syrup, Check the density as it heats up and bottle at 190.
    Steve

    2017
    2x8 Mason drop tube evaporator
    420 Taps
    3 surflo pumps on 5/16
    79 gallons of syrup made
    2016
    New kitchen addition to sap house
    400 taps
    52 gallons syrup made

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