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Thread: Holding concentrate in a working bulk tank

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaun View Post
    Does UVM run the agitator in the tank continuous, some or not at all?
    We run the agitator if there is concentrate in the tank. This is not so much to aerate the concentrate as it is to keep the concentrate cool throughout.

    For aeration, we use no-clog spray nozzle heads for sap coming out of the electric releaser into sap tanks. We've done it this way for several years. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XxR8VzFiH4
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

  2. #12
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    What does the aeration do for the sap? Sorry if it's a dumb question.
    Chad

    2014: 12 taps, 5 gal buckets
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  3. #13
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    Aeration adds oxygen to the sap, which comes from a very anoxic environment in the tubing. This changes the type of microbial flora which grows in the sap, and tends to make darker, but better tasting syrup towards the end of the season. Not a huge amount of research has been done on it yet.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

  4. #14
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    Is there any issues with running refrigerated Concentrate into a Steam Away?

    Does the refrigerated sap need to be trickled into the evaporator to keep the boil from slowing down to much?

  5. #15
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    Canada
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    Does feeding refrigerated sap/concentrate from a Milk tank into a Steam Away cause any changes in the process?

  6. #16
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    Dr. Tim,

    The aeration is only done on incoming "straight" sap, and not again when the concentrate is going into the bulk tank? The air is not "lost" or lessened during ROing? Or would concentrate benefit with another aeration nozzle at the concentrate discharge? Anything we all can do to help our late season sap will help. Especially on seasons like this years!

    Thanks.

    Steve
    2014 Upgrades!: 24x40 sugarhouse & 30"x10' Lapierre welded pans, wood fired w/ forced draft, homemade hood & preheater
    400 taps- half on gravity 5/16, half on gravity 3/16
    Airablo R.O. machine - in the house basement!
    Ford F-350 4x4 sap gatherer
    An assortment of barrels, cage tanks & bulk tanks- with one operational for cooling/holding concentrate
    And a few puzzled neighbors...

    http://s606.photobucket.com/albums/t...uckethead1920/

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bryan.22 View Post
    Is there any issues with running refrigerated Concentrate into a Steam Away?

    Does the refrigerated sap need to be trickled into the evaporator to keep the boil from slowing down to much?
    It can certainly be a good bit colder and can slow the boil in the inlet partition unless it is preheated. Likely the same would happen in a Steam-Away.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bucket Head View Post
    The aeration is only done on incoming "straight" sap, and not again when the concentrate is going into the bulk tank? The air is not "lost" or lessened during ROing? Or would concentrate benefit with another aeration nozzle at the concentrate discharge? Anything we all can do to help our late season sap will help. Especially on seasons like this years!
    So far we are only doing aeration of the incoming sap. Very likely aeration of the concentrate would also help, but there isn't any research on it yet. Our RO out stream is slow (but very sweet), so probably not enough pressure to really aerate it much, but it could be done another way.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

  9. #19
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    Mar 2008
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    Canterbury, NH
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    We have a 1600 gallon mueller milk tank, submarine shaped with a manway on the top. The cooling heat exchangers in the tank are questionable. One doesn't hold pressure, the other seems to. I spoke to a dairy milking system installer who recommended not using the heat exchangers in the tank but use an external chiller to cool the concentrate as it goes into the tank. He claims that the concentrate temperature will rise only about 1 degree per day in the insulated tank. Apparently many dairy farms are doing it this way. We anticipate sending 300 to 500 gallons of concentrate to the insulated tank per day when the sap runs. Another option would be to recirculate the concentrate from the insulated tank to the chiller and back to the tank. Is anyone doing this with concentrated sap?
    http://www.northfamilyfarm.com

    Tim
    2,500 taps on two pipelines
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  10. #20
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    NewYork
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    What type of chiller did the dairy guy recommend? I know it is common for dairies to use a well water powered plate cooler to lower the temp into the 60 degree range and then they use refrigeration to get milk down to upper 30 degree storage.
    For concentrate you will want to be in lower 30 to upper 20 range.
    I have been told that plate type coolers used in dairies will leak between the two fluid paths so you should not use chilled glycol to power one for maple concentrate.

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