+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Maple candy help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Upstate ny
    Posts
    14

    Default Maple candy help

    I've tried several times to make maple candy but I'm at a loss. I bring it up to 135-136 degrees and it never hardens. I sell 30-40 gallons of syrup every year with dozens of requests for candy and with a new evaporator I'm hoping for 60 gallons this year hopefully with maple candy on my menu. Please help
    2012 - 12 taps into gallon jugs / 1 gallon syrup
    2013 - 12 taps into gallon jugs / 1 gallon of burnt syrup 🤔
    2014 - 20 taps on buckets / 2.5 gallons of syrup
    2015 - 20 taps on buckets / 3 gallons of syrup
    2016 - 30 taps on buckets / 3.5 gallons of syrup
    2017 - 45 taps on buckets / 6.5 gallons of syrup
    2018 - 70 taps on buckets / discovered mapletrader.com / 40 taps on 3/16 into 300 gallon poly tank / Fuel tank evaporator build / no sleep whatsoever / 22 gallons and counting...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Barnet, VT
    Posts
    2,530

    Default

    244° You’re cooking it to cream temperature
    William
    950 taps
    3 X 12 Thor pans on a Brian Arch
    CDL 600 expandable

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Oakville, ON
    Posts
    128

    Default

    I suspect you're not cooking it long enough. When we make it we go by appearance rather than temp. The syrop goes to a heavy roiling foam and is ready when the large bubbles kind of plop when they burst. When the foam starts to darken where it folds under itself. At that point remove from heat and fold back and forth with a wooden paddle until it cools some (about 10 min of stirring). As soon as you see sugar starting to form at edges pour quickly into molds.
    If you cooked it right you will have light, golden brown sugar candies, too much and they will be dark brown and tasting of burnt sugar. Too little and the sugar will be soft or worse, stay as a sticky taffy that is very difficult to clean from the molds!
    2021 - 84 taps, 50L from 2100L
    2020 - 100 taps on buckets, 21L syrup from 2700L so far (FEB 26-Mar 13) and then the pandemic hit! End of our season!
    2019 - 62 taps on buckets, 95L syrop from 3215L sap
    2018 - 62 taps, collecting by hand, 90L syrop from 3200L sap
    2017 - Lapierre Waterloo Small mini pro with 40 taps
    2014 - 2016 40 taps making one or two batches on a 2x6 flat pan over an open arch as it would have been done in 1900

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Middlebury vt
    Posts
    28

    Default

    I go 135f but it all determines your barometric pressure. And that’s cream and candy. You really do need to have a good thermometer for this! Once it hits temp pull it off the heat and let it sit without bumping it untill it hits 180-190f stir it untill turns a whiteish color where the syrup losses it’s glossy look. And then pour into molds. If your not fast enough you can re heat and retry but I think it comes out more crystalish the second time
    30x8 leader drop flue
    400 taps and counting
    20x30’ sugar house
    2 vacuums and releasers sitting in the basement not being used.
    John Deere 3005
    Bobcat 753

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    chester, ma
    Posts
    588

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rselleck91 View Post
    I go 135f but it all determines your barometric pressure. And that’s cream and candy. You really do need to have a good thermometer for this! Once it hits temp pull it off the heat and let it sit without bumping it untill it hits 180-190f stir it untill turns a whiteish color where the syrup losses it’s glossy look. And then pour into molds. If your not fast enough you can re heat and retry but I think it comes out more crystalish the second time
    I'm confused. When it sits the temperature goes *up* 45 degrees?

    Gabe
    2016: Homemade arch from old woodburning stove; 2 steam tray pans; 6 taps; 1.1 galls
    2017: Same setup. 15 taps; 4.5 galls
    2018: Same setup. Limited time. 12 taps and short season; 2.2 galls
    2019: Very limited time. 7 taps and a short season; 1.8 galls
    2020: New Mason 2x3 XL halfway through season; 9 taps 2 galls
    2021: Same 2x3, 18 taps, 4.5 galls
    2022: 24 taps planned
    All taps on buckets

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Middlebury Center, PA
    Posts
    1,390

    Default

    Take it to 32-34 degrees above the boiling point of water, which is not the same for everyone. The MES (Maple Expert Solutions) app is one of the best (FREE) tools you can have for boiling syrup, because it uses the barometric pressure and elevation to calculate the boiling point. Second tool is buy a good thermometer I really like the Thermoworks Chef Alarm with a 12" probe well worth the money. after boiling let it cool to 200 or less depending on how you are making it. If you have a machine cooling more will make softer candy. If you are pouring cool less so you can get it all poured. It takes practice either way. We make 300-400 pieces a week for me cooking to the right temperature is the key.


    Jared
    Jared

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Rumney NH
    Posts
    110

    Default

    all good info, but they mist the most important thing lite syrup. late or dark syrup does not make good candy. might only make taffy. I only use the first two runs of the year for confections. it is all about inverted sugars. some test for the right levels. the darker the syrup the hotter the temp. start at 245-247. avoid humid days too.
    2017 140 taps 30x8 12x16 shack 28.5 gal
    2018 158 taps 30x8 12x16 shack with 8x8 kitchen 44 gal
    2019 223 taps 30x8 12x16 shack with 8x8 kitchen 36 gal
    2020 226 taps 30x8 12x16 shack with 8x8 kitchen 250 waterloo ro 63 gal
    2021 230 taps 30x8 12x16 shack with 8x8 kitchen 250 waterloo ro 37 gal

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts