+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Prescribed fire in a sugarbush

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Walpole, NH
    Posts
    1,161

    Default

    Also, leaf litter helps control erosion amongst the forest. Plus is home to many beneficial microbes and small creatures.
    Sugaring for 45+ years
    New Sugarhouse 14'x32'
    New to Me Algier 2'x8' wood fired evaporator
    225 Sugar Maples Currently,(105 on 3/16" and 110 on Shurflo 4008 vacuum, 10 gravity), (16,000 before being disabled)
    1947 Farmall H and Wagon with gathering tank
    2012 Kubota with forks to move wood around

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    I agree I would never burn a hardwood forest, especially on a slope. Nothing good about it. Pines are a different story as they acidify the soil and burning helps, but the hardwood forest needs that ground cover. Cut some area s thin and let light in and then you'll get your bid explosion of growth
    125-150 taps
    Smokey Lakes Full pint Hybrid pan
    Modified half pint arch
    Air over fire
    All 3/16 tubing
    Southern Ohio

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Center, Underhill Ctr, VT
    Posts
    5,347

    Default

    Maple trees are fairly susceptible to fire damage until they develop thick bark. The tubing system would be toast.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Savoy, MA
    Posts
    345

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMapleSyrup View Post
    The hope for a prescribed burn would be to clean off the leaf litter allowing the ground to be warmed and have natural regeneration of the forest floor with forbes and legumes. I manage my property for maple, bees, and deer. Having a prescribed fire provides a bioligical desert under the canopy to regenerate and provide a lot of food for deer and small animals.
    Have you been watching Dr. Woods Growing Deer TV? I also manage for whitetail...I totally hear what you're trying to do. If you have a mature sugarbush, I'll assume you have a biological desert not because of the leaf litter but because of your maple canopy. You don't have much sunlight hitting the forest floor. I'd suggest managing for deer elsewhere on your property, and managing for maple syrup in the sugar bush.

    Are you managing for whitetails for hunting, or just because you like to see deer? I'll assume the former...you don't often hear of a mature sugar bush being a good place to hunt deer, unless you really thin it out to create a high stem count amongst your mature maples. Also, not sure what kind of legumes you're going to get coming up in the forest unless you plant something?

    So with that said, you can actually use your sugarbush to your advantage specifically because it IS a deer desert. Creating good deer habitat adjacent to and up wind of a sugarbush is a great way to always be sure there are no deer downwind of you. You can create you access and egress trails to your stands through the maples so you can reduce your negative deer encounters on your way into and out of your stands. And if you have a mature sugar maple stand that butts up against some seriously managed deer habitat...young, thick, high stem count, maybe a food plot...you also now have an edge, and deer love edge habitat of any kind.

    So yes, it's tempting to manage every square inch of land for whitetails. But sometimes the best management practice is create deer deserts and then use those to your advantage.
    Last edited by bigschuss; 02-20-2021 at 07:52 AM.
    16x24 Timber Frame Sugar House
    Mason 2x4 Evaporator
    90 trees on buckets

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    bigschuss makes a good point. My woods is much like this. The front is my Maple bush and the back is oak dominate. I cut about 50% of the high grade oak out and it exploded, but I only cut a few oaks out of my Maple section and you can see all the way through it, as it has a very low stem density. The deer travel through it some but a main trail runs right along the transition. I don't deer hunt but I have guys who do hunt my place. They have their stands right along this transition line and they kill deer there every year.
    125-150 taps
    Smokey Lakes Full pint Hybrid pan
    Modified half pint arch
    Air over fire
    All 3/16 tubing
    Southern Ohio

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Williston, VT
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Here's my 2 cents:

    1. Assuming that you have a forestry management plan, then check with your forestry professional about what you're planning. If you don't have a forestry management plan (most common with woods over about 50 acres), then hire a forestry consultant and get one done. Another option is to check with your county forester or other state agency. They can be very helpful.

    2. Check with the state fish and wildlife department. Here in Vermont, we have biology experts that will come out to walk your property with you to help advise you on making your land good for wildlife habitat and eliminating invasive species. And it could be free like in Vermont.

    3. Call your local fire department before burning. They probably require a permit and want to know your plan for controlling the fire. If the conditions are not suitable for burning they will decline to issue a permit.

    4. Check with your insurance company. What if the fire gets out of control and burns someone else's property, or your house? Are you covered?

    Ken
    Ken & Sherry
    Williston, VT

    2017 - 13 gallons on 65 taps (12 buckets, rest 3/16), 2x4 flat bottom, modified cargo box sugarhouse
    2018 - 90 gallons on 418 taps (gravity lines), Leader 30"x10' Vortex Arch & Max Raised Flue with Rev Syrup Pan, New Sugarhouse
    2019 - Burned through alot more money: heated kitchen, 2x2,000 and 375 gal ss sap tanks, CDL1200 RO, Bauch Vac Pump, More taps, etc., etc., etc.
    https://www.facebook.com/pumpkinhillmaple/

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Oneida NY
    Posts
    10,890

    Default

    Back about 15 years ago I got in touch with a state forester who walked my woods with me. He asked hundreds of questions on what I wanted in my woods. He then wrote up a suggested Forest Stewardship plan and had me study it and make suggestions for edits, I returned it to him. This process went back and forth 2x, then he wrote up a final plan, which became my official management plan. The cost "ZERO" ! I'm in New York State and the plan was for a small 15 acre parcel.
    A friend of mine had the same thing done, also using a state forester on a 200+ acre piece, same price, ZERO!
    Check your state, you may have a county or state forester who does this type of service, all on your tax dollars. Best place to start.
    Dave Klish about 400 taps, down from much more. Will hold about the same for 2021
    2012 Mahindra 36 HP 4x4/ loader/cab/heat/AC:-)
    3x8 raised flue evaporator
    250 GPH converted to electric, RO by Ray Gingerich
    6.32 KW solar system, 1.48KW is battery backed up, all net metered
    website: www.cnymaple.com

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Esko,MN
    Posts
    254

    Default

    Thanks for all the replies. My situation is that my sugarbush sits on the only flatter land on my property. The property is 43 acres that is surrounded by a 9,000 acre state park. All of the area is old growth forest. The flatter land is being tapped, I have a forestry management plan but up here, the foresters don't know anything about managing a sugarbush. The property border to the North is where there was approximately 5 acres of open farm land that now has a couple of food plots and about 3 acres of white spruce. The deer move out of the state park toward my food plots; however, now that I tubed my woods after having a select cut done over the winter, the deer movement has changed dramatically. I do hunt but only for trophy bucks, about 30 acres of land is gorges and ravines with a drop from my sugar shack to the bottom of the ravines of about 120'. Not much maple in those ravines either. Just trying to maximize my woods for maple, deer, and pollinators. Yes, I do follow Dr. Woods on Growing Deer TV and he is an avid believer in prescribed fire. Since it sounds like maples are sensitive to some fire, I won't ponder this anymore. My canopy in the sugarbush is opened up and I will work on the slopes to promote deer health and growth. Thanks for the replies.

    Bigschuss: Unfortunately, the sugarbush is upwind of the area the deer come from and the food plots are upwind of the sugarbush. Not a great layout for ingress and egress. Because of the tubing, the deer aren't getting out to the food plots until well after dark.
    Last edited by DocsMapleSyrup; 02-22-2021 at 08:20 PM.
    Chad

    2014: 12 taps, 5 gal buckets
    2015: 15 taps on bags
    2016: 150 taps: 100 on bags, 50 on 3/16" natural vac, 2x8 AUF/AOF Homebuilt Arch, 2x8 SL Drop Flu & Auto Draw, SL Propane Canner/Bottler
    2017: 225 taps: Built Lean to, Added SL hood, preheater, concentric exhaust, SL SS 7" SB Filter Press
    2018: 180 taps: Added Shurflo to 50 - 3/16", Auto fill sensor to head tank
    2019: No tapping
    2020: 175 taps
    2021: 300 taps, homemade RO and releaser

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Savoy, MA
    Posts
    345

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMapleSyrup View Post
    Thanks for all the replies. My situation is that my sugarbush sits on the only flatter land on my property. The property is 43 acres that is surrounded by a 9,000 acre state park. All of the area is old growth forest. The flatter land is being tapped, I have a forestry management plan but up here, the foresters don't know anything about managing a sugarbush. The property border to the North is where there was approximately 5 acres of open farm land that now has a couple of food plots and about 3 acres of white spruce. The deer move out of the state park toward my food plots; however, now that I tubed my woods after having a select cut done over the winter, the deer movement has changed dramatically. I do hunt but only for trophy bucks, about 30 acres of land is gorges and ravines with a drop from my sugar shack to the bottom of the ravines of about 120'. Not much maple in those ravines either. Just trying to maximize my woods for maple, deer, and pollinators. Yes, I do follow Dr. Woods on Growing Deer TV and he is an avid believer in prescribed fire. Since it sounds like maples are sensitive to some fire, I won't ponder this anymore. My canopy in the sugarbush is opened up and I will work on the slopes to promote deer health and growth. Thanks for the replies.

    Bigschuss: Unfortunately, the sugarbush is upwind of the area the deer come from and the food plots are upwind of the sugarbush. Not a great layout for ingress and egress. Because of the tubing, the deer aren't getting out to the food plots until well after dark.
    Aah, I see. Yes, that sounds a bit tricky. I actually have something similar...a nice spruce bedding area upwind of my sugar bush...which is upwind of my core deer habitat. I use buckets though, so the deer have no problem moving through the maples.

    Good luck. I guess you could ask what you like better....collecting sap on lines or nice deer movements. No question for me. I know lines on 300 taps saves you a ton of energy collecting sap. But if messed up my deer hunting I wouldn't even think about going back to bags or buckets and reducing my tap count.

    I watch Dr. Woods also. It's the only show I'll watch. Would love to buy a small chunk in the Ozarks when I retire.
    16x24 Timber Frame Sugar House
    Mason 2x4 Evaporator
    90 trees on buckets

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Walpole, NH
    Posts
    1,161

    Default

    Keep your lines pushed up on the trees during the off season as much as you can and the deer will pass through them without problems. I keep mine pushed up 6-7 feet in the air and my bush is always full of deer tracks. Also, make sure you don’t cut all the evergreen trees, deer like them in the winter time to seek shelter under.
    Sugaring for 45+ years
    New Sugarhouse 14'x32'
    New to Me Algier 2'x8' wood fired evaporator
    225 Sugar Maples Currently,(105 on 3/16" and 110 on Shurflo 4008 vacuum, 10 gravity), (16,000 before being disabled)
    1947 Farmall H and Wagon with gathering tank
    2012 Kubota with forks to move wood around

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts