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Thread: Anchoring buckets on 5\16 drops

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central WI
    Posts
    49

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    Trapper2,

    We use approx. 4' drops to buckets, in a former life they were cake frosting pails, 2+ gallon capacity; we dig the snow out at the base of the tree and place the buckets on the ground and then pack snow around them to keep the sap cold and the buckets from tipping over or blowing over due to winds. If little or no snow, then we do the rock trick or lean a heavy branch on the lid to help stabilize the bucket in place. Our woods is flat as a pancake so difficult to use tubing; we push the end of the drops through a matching hole in the bucket lid, no bark, no critters.
    2010 - 12 taps, turkey fryer, 4 quarts
    2011 - 24 taps, homemade arch from old water tank, 16"x24" flat pan, 16+ quarts
    2012 - 9 taps, 3 pints, what a season
    2013 - 60 taps, homemade oil tank arch with 2'x4' flat pan, 16"x24" finishing pan on electric range, 55 quarts
    2014 - 80 taps, homemade oil tank arch with 2'x4' flat pan, 16"x24" finishing pan on electric range, 40 quarts
    2015 - 100 taps, 15 gallons
    2016 - 115 taps, 13.5 gallons
    2017 - 120 taps, 13 gallons
    2018 - 130 taps, 11 gallons

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    New Hartford, N.Y.
    Posts
    2,040

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    Ditto on all of the above. We did plastic buckets with tubing into them for years and they worked great. No bugs, tree parts, animals or other in the sap. Rocks, bricks and in the open, very windy locations, a piece of broken cement block on the lids. That had a little more weight to it. And we drilled a slightly smaller hole than the 5/16 tube I.D. in the lid. That way we had to force the tube in, which kept the lid on the hose if the bucket did get away. That way we only had to locate the bucket, which was usually easy to spot. A lid covered by inches of wind blown snow, not so much... lol.
    2014 Upgrades!: 24x40 sugarhouse & 30"x10' Lapierre welded pans, wood fired w/ forced draft, homemade hood & preheater
    400 taps- half on gravity 5/16, half on gravity 3/16
    Airablo R.O. machine - in the house basement!
    Ford F-350 4x4 sap gatherer
    An assortment of barrels, cage tanks & bulk tanks- with one operational for cooling/holding concentrate
    And a few puzzled neighbors...

    http://s606.photobucket.com/albums/t...uckethead1920/

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    401

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    Quote Originally Posted by SDdave View Post
    For what it's worth...I have found that a water bottle (the cheap crinkly type) inside the bucket provides enough weight to keep it on the ground during the "soft" winds, but for those high wind days a trusty string tied to the handle is the best!

    SDdave
    . I used parachute cord wrapped around the tree and hooked to the bucket the last 3 weeks of the season, seemed to work well.
    1960 - 1970s 70 taps on galvanized buckets with Dad and Grandpa.
    1970s - 1985 Acted crazy!
    1986 - 2005 20-30 buckets.
    2006- 2017 70 buckets and bags
    2017-2019 100 bags and buckets
    2020 Finally retired!!! 75 buckets, 50-75 on tubing. RO Bucket, New 12 X 16 Shack and a 36X42 flat pan.
    2021-Adding another 125 taps along with a second RO bucket.
    Lots of Family and Friends and a dog named Skyy!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    401

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Yooper View Post
    Trapper2,

    We use approx. 4' drops to buckets, in a former life they were cake frosting pails, 2+ gallon capacity; we dig the snow out at the base of the tree and place the buckets on the ground and then pack snow around them to keep the sap cold and the buckets from tipping over or blowing over due to winds. If little or no snow, then we do the rock trick or lean a heavy branch on the lid to help stabilize the bucket in place. Our woods is flat as a pancake so difficult to use tubing; we push the end of the drops through a matching hole in the bucket lid, no bark, no critters.
    Yes I always pack snow around them also and then we had a big Thaw and the buckets either tipped over or blew over. Thanks.
    1960 - 1970s 70 taps on galvanized buckets with Dad and Grandpa.
    1970s - 1985 Acted crazy!
    1986 - 2005 20-30 buckets.
    2006- 2017 70 buckets and bags
    2017-2019 100 bags and buckets
    2020 Finally retired!!! 75 buckets, 50-75 on tubing. RO Bucket, New 12 X 16 Shack and a 36X42 flat pan.
    2021-Adding another 125 taps along with a second RO bucket.
    Lots of Family and Friends and a dog named Skyy!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central WI
    Posts
    49

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    we're light on the snow here for this time of year; heading into spring I like to plow up a big snow bank near the sugar shack and cover it with a light colored tarp, I use that to surround the 275 gal tote tank to keep the sap cold until the weekend boils; I can usually keep a good supply of snow until mid April or so when the season ends; pretty cheap refrigeration, just hoping Mother Nature comes through by mid March with the white stuff, just not too much at a time
    2010 - 12 taps, turkey fryer, 4 quarts
    2011 - 24 taps, homemade arch from old water tank, 16"x24" flat pan, 16+ quarts
    2012 - 9 taps, 3 pints, what a season
    2013 - 60 taps, homemade oil tank arch with 2'x4' flat pan, 16"x24" finishing pan on electric range, 55 quarts
    2014 - 80 taps, homemade oil tank arch with 2'x4' flat pan, 16"x24" finishing pan on electric range, 40 quarts
    2015 - 100 taps, 15 gallons
    2016 - 115 taps, 13.5 gallons
    2017 - 120 taps, 13 gallons
    2018 - 130 taps, 11 gallons

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