+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: is preheater really worth it?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    29

    Default

    up until this year I used 4 steam table pans set down inside the fire to act as drop flue pans. I had a small pump system that would trickle feed cold sap into each pan seperatly. This was all on a concrete block arch made from the big roadside concrete blocks. I never lost a rolling boil doing it this way and I was able to hit 12 GPH several times throughout the season but 10 GPH was very normal. I never ladeled any sap until the end when I would move the sap forward to finish up, once a pan was empty I would fill it with water. I added a picture of what my setup was. when I acheived 12 GPH I would block the top 2/3 of the door opening with a big green log up on a couple bricks so that air was drawn from under the fire grate. once my door was burned up too much I would make a new one.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    2016-two straws stuck in tree by the kids-1 pint syrup
    2017-40 taps 8 gal. syrup
    2018-70 taps...19 gal syrup
    2019-90 taps....18.5 gal syrup
    2020- ? taps....unknown syrup.....new oil barrel arch

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Benewing View Post
    Hello All,

    I am running a very DIY setup compared to everyone else's but I have a question about preheaters. Right now, I am running a setup with two hotel pans, end to end, and batch boiling everything. Usually I just add cold sap to both and let it boil down a while, and add more. This boil I'm going to use one as the preheater and use a ladle every so often to let the other one keep a roiling boil. Do you think keeping a rolling boil will actually helps with boil times? Or is it just about pumping BTUs into the sap?
    Attachment 21124
    I think you would benefit from a pre-heater. In my opinion, it's all about maintaining the boil, and you're losing the boil every time you add cold sap. You might consider a DIY gravity fed preheater like I use. It consists of a tub (which I lay a filter cloth over) with a short pipe and valve draining out the bottom. This is attached to copper tubing coiled around the stove pipe and draining into a corner of the pan. I have the coil wrapped with aluminum foil to hold the heat. The idea is to create a trickle of warm sap that (ideally) matches evaporation. It can be a balancing act getting the trickle just right, but it generally works well. You have to be careful to keep a steady flow, otherwise the sap will boil in the tubing and plug it up. When all the sap is gone, I redirect the end of the tubing off to the side and just run water through the tubing until I finish the boil.

    arch_and_pan.jpg 0311201316.jpg 0311201316a.jpg
    Last edited by tommymc; 03-11-2020 at 12:57 PM. Reason: add photos

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Oneida NY
    Posts
    10,337

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by In da bush View Post
    I’ve been on both sides of pre-heating and I will say hands down that preheating is the only way imho. If you can fashion a hood to capture the heat of your steam and put a pre-heater inside the hood, you’re gonna bump evap rate up. Teach yourself how to solder and build a preheater. I built a preheater similar to the one that smoky lake maple sells for around 1k,cold sap going in and 170-180 after it’s gone through the preheater. I cobbled a hood out of a stainless drum from a clothes dryer that I cut in half,cost me $0.00.
    Good luck and good sugaring!!

    http://mapletrader.com/community/att...0&d=1550849505
    I'll bet your wife got upset when she went to dry the cloths!
    Dave Klish about 1320 taps in '15, doing fewer each year, about 450 planned for 2020 (and after?)
    2012 Mahindra 36 HP 4x4/ loader/cab/heat/AC:-)
    3x8 raised flue evaporator
    250 GPH converted to electric, RO by Ray Gingerich
    6.32 KW solar system, 1.48KW is battery backed up, all net metered
    http://s1041.photobucket.com/albums/...anssugarhouse/
    website: www.cnymaple.com

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mid-coast Maine
    Posts
    55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maple flats View Post
    I'll bet your wife got upset when she went to dry the cloths!
    Thereís a reason Iím not married😜🤣
    It was from the "pile of treasures",no working clothes dryers were harmed in the construction of the hood

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    379

    Default

    IMG_1523.jpg
    I constantly trickle 40 degree sap into my top pan to preheat and then it exits that slowly at 80-100 degrees. Darn sidways picture.
    1960 - 1970s 70 taps on galvanized buckets with Dad and Grandpa.
    1970s - 1985 Acted crazy!
    1986 - 2005 20-30 buckets.
    2006- 2017 70 buckets and bags
    2017-2019 100 bags and buckets
    2020 Finally retired!!! 75 buckets, 50-75 on tubing. RO Bucket, New 12 X 16 Shack and a 36X42 flat pan.
    Lots of Family and Friends and a dog named Skyy!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pomfret in North East CT
    Posts
    36

    Default

    I think a pre heater makes a huge difference. A coil preheater is easy to make and has a short learning curve. When I originally started using mine I did what what tommymc did., run water through it when there was no more sap. I stopped doing that and found no issues with burnt sap in the tube. When I start a new boil I just catch the first pint or two in a coffee can in case there's anything burnt in the tube. I us 3/8" copper. It also comes in handy to make hot water at clean up.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    2020 ~New Smokey Lake Dauntless w/flat pan
    Home made coil pre heater
    35 taps on drop lines
    6 on hanging buckets

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Potsdam in far northern New York
    Posts
    739

    Default

    It's all about BTUs. You get them from your fuel, and add them to your liquid. A preheater should capture wasted or lost BTUs from steam of flue heat. Steam is a better heat-transfer medium. Simply adding more fuel isn't really a preheater, jut a bigger evaporator.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Tioga county, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7

    Default

    A preheated pan can be made very simply.

    Another restaurant tray, a step drill, and a cheap brass ball valve with a threaded nipple on one end. The steam trays are typically 24 gauge stainless. Very thin. Once the right diameter hole is drilled, the threaded nipple will screw right into the tray with nothing else on the backside.

    I like to set mine on trickle so I get a few minutes to do other stuff. If you set that trickle tray on top, you would only need to ladle from the one pan to the finish pan without losing to much boil. HTH.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Kronenwetter, WI
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by In da bush View Post
    Thereís a reason Iím not married😜🤣
    It was from the "pile of treasures",no working clothes dryers were harmed in the construction of the hood
    I knew there was a reason I am keeping that old dryer stored in the shed. Have to take a closer look at that.

    (In da bush - Mid Coast Maine - Back in the day I spent several years in Rockland and some time up in Gods Country - Lubec. Beautiful country)

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mid-coast Maine
    Posts
    55

    Default

    It is indeed beautiful out here,I grew up in the Midwest and did some time in the NE wisco area. Iím a big fan of western and northern wisco these days. Happy boiling!!!

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts