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Thread: A sin against God and man

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Cornwall, CT
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    Default A sin against God and man

    I've got this one section of woods that I haven't done too much with. Its a past-mature white pine forest yielding to maple, ash (dying) and hickory. Pines are falling, canopy is opening up and its got the potential to be a nice chunk of sugar bush with a decent western exposure and a good slope for 3/16 tubing. There are lots of sugar maple saplings dispersed over this couple acres, but they're thicker than ideal and really need to be thinned out, however, that thinning process is a job that won't get done for a few years.

    So I got to thinking...I'm going to run the lines though my regular trees this weekend and am tempted to tap a certain percentage of the trees on this new section. Maybe 30%? But, I'm talking about saplings maybe 2"-3"DBH. Normally I would never even consider it but I'm going to be thinning out probably half the saplings on this chuck anyway.

    Will this kill the trees? If it does its not the end of the world as they're going to be culled anyway. And what if they live? Is it worth using these trees as an experiment for that alone? If I understand it correctly, Dr. Tim whacks the crown out of saplings every 5 years or so and they seem to recover quite well and come back for more. If so, what's the harm in tapping these little guys? If they die, I don't really mind as they're probably going to be pruned at the stump anyway.

    Will I ever be able to look a respectful producer in the eye again?
    1980 - 6 taps, stone fire pit, drain pan evaporator, 1 pint of syrup
    2016 - 55 taps on 3/16 and gravity, new sugar shack, 2x3 Mason XL, 16 gallons of syrup
    Inception of Young Love Maple
    2017 - 170 taps on 3/16, 30 on buckets, 2x4 Mason XL, NextGen RO. 50 gallons of syrup
    2018 - 19 more acres, 250+ taps on gravity and buckets, 2x5 Smokey Lake arch and Beaverland pan.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Quaker Hill, CT
    Posts
    285

    Default

    If the tree is doomed to meet a saw in the next few years I don't see the harm in tapping it to get something out of it. You will get sap and probably a good amount but it will be low in sugar.

    Tap em while you got em.
    2017 25 taps on buckets got me hooked 1 gallon of sweet
    2018 51 taps on 3/16 tubing/ DIY oil tank evaporator 8.5gallons finished
    2019 60 taps 7 gallons finished ended season short
    2020 New 2x4 divided pan ready to get away from the headache that is steam table pans

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Oneida NY
    Posts
    10,340

    Default

    Look for studies that have been done on sapling stumps. It has proven quite successful.
    A point, one can sin against God, but not against man, but that is not for discussion on this forum.
    Dave Klish about 1320 taps in '15, doing fewer each year, about 450 planned for 2020 (and after?)
    2012 Mahindra 36 HP 4x4/ loader/cab/heat/AC:-)
    3x8 raised flue evaporator
    250 GPH converted to electric, RO by Ray Gingerich
    6.32 KW solar system, 1.48KW is battery backed up, all net metered
    http://s1041.photobucket.com/albums/...anssugarhouse/
    website: www.cnymaple.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Cornwall, CT
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maple flats View Post
    A point, one can sin against God, but not against man, but that is not for discussion on this forum.
    I was quoting Steve Rinella for a funny.
    1980 - 6 taps, stone fire pit, drain pan evaporator, 1 pint of syrup
    2016 - 55 taps on 3/16 and gravity, new sugar shack, 2x3 Mason XL, 16 gallons of syrup
    Inception of Young Love Maple
    2017 - 170 taps on 3/16, 30 on buckets, 2x4 Mason XL, NextGen RO. 50 gallons of syrup
    2018 - 19 more acres, 250+ taps on gravity and buckets, 2x5 Smokey Lake arch and Beaverland pan.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    toronto
    Posts
    240

    Default

    Tap the saplings - you are on the frontier

    Syrup from saplings may substitute for sugarbush ...


    https://www.reformer.com/stories/syr...-for-sugarbush...

    Jan 31, 2014 · BURLINGTON -- A new method of harvesting sap from young trees could revolutionize maple syrup production in Vermont -- and potentially around the world. Researchers at the University of Vermont's Proctor Maple Research Center have discovered that sugar maple saplings produce the same sweet liquid that mature trees yield
    2010 40 buckets- 4 gals finished
    2011 80 buckets- 14 gals finished
    2012 105 buckets- 8 gals finished
    2013 maxed at 130 buckets- 24 gals finished
    2014 new max at 240 buckets- 18 gals finished
    2015 newest max 240 buckets-+48 taps on 3/16 gravity- 22.5 gals finished
    2016 150 taps on 3/16 gravity- tba

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Loudon NH
    Posts
    5,622

    Default

    I would figure out which ones are going to get pruned at the stump and tap them. I would use 1/4" taps to minimize the damage. Tapping them won't kill them and moving the tap hole up or down and going around the tree won't weaken them when you tap in the future. Get what you can out of them before you turn them into firewood.
    Russ

    "Red Roof Maples" Where the term "boiling soda" was first introduced to the maple producing world!

    Algier 2x6 evaporator, W F Mason arch
    Lapierre 250 Turbo RO machine
    SP-22 vacuum pump
    1930 Ford Model AA Doodlebug tractor
    1971 IH 454 52hp diesel tractor
    A couple of Honda 4 wheelers
    About a dozen chainsaws and no chickens

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Center, Underhill Ctr, VT
    Posts
    4,910

    Default

    The question that goes along with this is whether or not it is worth it. The volume of sap from small trees is low, so it takes high densities to be worthwhile. I can’t say whether it will work on 3/16” tubing. Maybe, maybe not. We’ve only tried with pumped vacuum. Lastly, the trees will recover in an open setting. You may well kill them in 3-5 yrs if growing under a forest canopy.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

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