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Thread: 2x2 build - Looking for fire door and stack transition plans/pictures/descriptions

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Albion PA
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    4,286

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TimJ View Post
    My welding is truly awful, but I am getting better.

    Here it is with legs

    Attachment 19084

    pan on top. It actually fits and is kinda level. AmazingAttachment 19085
    Several basic things to improving your welding skills. First is visibility. If you dont have one get a good hood that has the instant darkening feature. next is make sure you can see while your welding. get in good position. turn the part to get it in a horizontal position. and if you need a magnifier inside the hood get that too. (that's usually a age thing) Next biggest is the welder. Not sure what you have? Mig systems are very user friendly. One with gas shielded are the best type and with good heat controls. For the stuff your welding you should be able to crank it up and burn in the weld pretty good without fear of hurting anything.
    Last is practice!
    Your doing good! You can fabricate a lot of things for this hobby so hone your welding skills.
    Regards,
    Chris
    Casbohm Maple and Honey
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    3x10 King, WRU & preheater, AOF [TRS] and AUF
    SIRO Filter Press.
    2015 Ford F250 PSD sap hauler
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    Ford Jubilee and several Allis WD's, and IH tractors

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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Live in NY, Sugarhouse in Milton VT
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    113

    Default Making adjustable legs

    Gotta have adjustable legs/feet.

    I have seen projects where people weld 2 sides of a nut to angle iron legs. I wanted more strength so I decide to make brackets, drill oversized hole, mount the nut on the underside and weld the nut to the bracket, then weld the bracket to the leg. This would spread the load across more area. At least that is what I figured.

    One of the nuts is trashed - I must have heated it too much or got splatter in the threads - so I will cut it out, but here are the pics

    Set up: I tightened a nut on the front and back of the bracket to snug it up, then spot welded two sides. I backed the bolt out, jammed a stick in the nut and finished welding all sides.

    IMG_20190107_192955.jpg

    IMG_20190107_193001.jpg


    IMG_20190107_193902.jpg

    Then I welded each bracket to bottom of each leg.
    IMG_20190107_194835.jpg

    IMG_20190107_194907.jpg

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
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    Leave a bolt in the nut when welding. This will save the threads. You can use a sacrificial bolt in case you get splatter on the threads. I used 3/4 inch nuts and bolts and just welded the nut to the inside of the upright angle iron.
    Smoky Lake 2x6 dropflu pans and hoods on homemade arch
    Smoky Lake 6 gallon water jacked bottler
    Concentric Exhaust
    250 Deer Run RO
    325 taps

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Live in NY, Sugarhouse in Milton VT
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    113

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    Quote Originally Posted by Super Sapper View Post
    Leave a bolt in the nut when welding. This will save the threads. You can use a sacrificial bolt in case you get splatter on the threads. I used 3/4 inch nuts and bolts and just welded the nut to the inside of the upright angle iron.
    I used the correct size bolt in the hole when tacking, then switched to a wooden dowel and a smaller bolt that just dropped in - to protect the nuts when completing the weld. Worked except for one - where I forgot to put in the dowel when I finished a weld. So, will cut that one off and re-weld a new nut.

    Welding nuts to inside of angle iron probably would have worked for me, but I have very little experience and was unsure if my welds would be good enough. The way I did it was overkill but will work well. In the future 7/8 or 3/4 inch nuts welded to the inside of the angle are the way to go.

    Latest pics:
    Test fitting back plate where I need to attach the collar/transition for the stack

    I wish I had a sheet metal roller to make the collar...
    (shown in the pic is the collar from a vogelzang kit - I have not figured out a simple way to use it given the radius it has on the underside)

    IMG_20190108_102322.jpg
    IMG_20190108_102337.jpg
    Last edited by TimJ; 01-08-2019 at 10:54 AM.

  5. #15
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    Mar 2005
    Location
    Albion PA
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    4,286

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    Tim,
    Your weld on that first nut looks very good. Frame looks good too. You can roll sheet metal on the edge of a solid bench with the metal clamped, then gently apply force and bend a little. move the sheet and repeat till you have what you need.
    Regards,
    Chris
    Casbohm Maple and Honey
    640 ish roadside taps
    3x10 King, WRU & preheater, AOF [TRS] and AUF
    SIRO Filter Press.
    2015 Ford F250 PSD sap hauler
    One hives of bees
    One Golden named Maggie Cat named Lucy
    Too many Cub Cadets
    Ford Jubilee and several Allis WD's, and IH tractors

    www.mapleandhoney.com

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Carbon County, PA
    Posts
    60

    Default

    3FB670F5-6E82-4DCC-B2B8-CD99EB7E704D.jpg

    I just made my own base stack from 18ga. I laid it out from like the guy in this video. My base stack was 20”x4” rectangle base which transitions to a round 6” top.

    https://youtu.be/6fUDGRTx5xQ

    Make it in 2 halves and practice your sheet metal welding. Fit up both seams tight. Stitch weld it about an inch and move to a new spot to spread around the heat.
    Last edited by HondoLane; 01-10-2019 at 08:16 PM.

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