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Thread: monitoring system

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    vermont
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    17

    Default monitoring system

    using a monitoring system, pros and cons?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Jacksonport Wisc
    Posts
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    Cons... you can't leave your house after six PM and they make your ankle itch. Can't think of any pros

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    central NH
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    140

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haynes Forest Products View Post
    Cons... you can't leave your house after six PM and they make your ankle itch. Can't think of any pros
    LMAO
    Steve

    2017
    2x8 Mason drop tube evaporator
    420 Taps
    3 surflo pumps on 5/16
    79 gallons of syrup made
    2016
    New kitchen addition to sap house
    400 taps
    52 gallons syrup made

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Jacksonport Wisc
    Posts
    5,336

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    The pros are you get to sleep in and not stare at the ceiling wondering if you should turn the pump on. You have real time vacuum levels that allow you to walk the woods fixing the lines. you should never allow a tank to run over costing you syrup. You will have one more reason to stare at your smart phone every 5 min that doesn't involve tracking your kids. If you get the right system you will be able to put a monitor on your sap shack wall and see what is happening in your woods, it will show you if the sap is flowing. How fast the tanks are filling the condition of all your mainlines. There is a graph that will show you when and how fast your tanks filled during the day. Will turn your pump on and off and how well the motor is running.

    You will have more time with your evap or walking the woods.

    There are some cons if you don't have a good WiFi signal things can go down and you get so dependent on it you become a crazy person but the good thing is along with that ankle bracelet you most likely took 10 anger management classes that you can think back on.
    Last edited by Haynes Forest Products; 08-30-2018 at 09:55 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Howell, mi
    Posts
    808

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    I remotely monitor tons of stuff in the shack, from the RO to the evaporator, to the vacuum and tank levels…
    it would help if you were a little more specific in what type of monitoring system you were looking at.

    Assuming we’re talking remote vacuum monitoring:
    Pro’s- detects leaks and ice dams in the main lines.
    Con’s- Cost.

    Commercial systems, depending on the number of nodes needed, can quickly add up to significant cost.
    This cost can be offset by detecting leaks early and/or identifying ice dams or other problems that lead to inefficient vacuum transfer to taps downstream of the problem area.
    By identifying and eliminating these problems quickly, higher production yields can be obtained.

    Ever have a branch come down across a main?
    Ever ask yourself “Gee, wonder how long that’s been there?”
    The ice dam that inevitably forms beneath that branch can take hours to thaw.
    That’s time you’re not getting vacuum to taps downstream.
    Multiply by the number of days the branch went unnoticed.
    That’s the strongest argument I can make in favor of the system.

    How long does it take and how often do you walk your woods?
    If the answers are not long and daily, that would be an argument against.
    42.67N 84.02W


    350 taps- 300 on vacuum, 50 buckets
    JD gator 625i Sap hauler w/65 gal tank
    Leader 2X6 drop flue

    Homemade auto draw-off
    Homemade preheater
    Homebrew RO, 2- xle-4040's
    LaPierre double vertical releaser
    Kinney KC-8 vacuum pump

    12X24 shack
    Lots of chickens and a few cats.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Thetford, VT
    Posts
    277

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    As mentioned the cons are cost and trouble shooting should an issue arise. We had a level sensor not work out of the box. It took a few days because the signal and connection were great, but the levels would very too much for the flow of sap. We would drive down and check it and find the levels out of whack. We put the second sensor, for another tank we plan to monitor, in place of the first one and everything was within 3/4" for the level and actual level.

    I would recommend it. The system will save a lot of time in travel if you live off site and will be a nice convenience it you live there. You can also chart the history of the sensor readings.

    Mike
    Tapping since 1985 (four generations back to early to mid 1900s). 200-250 taps on buckets and then tubing in the mid 90s. 2013- 275 taps w/sap puller 25 gal. 2014-295 taps w/sap puller 55 ga. (re-tapped to vacuum theory) 2015-330 taps full vac. 65 gal, 2016-400 taps 105 gal, 2017-400 taps 95 gal. 2018-additional 800' mainline and maybe 400 new taps for a total near 800 taps. 2x6 Leader WSE (last year on it) supported by a 250 gph RO.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Wotzling
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tweegs View Post
    I remotely monitor tons of stuff in the shack, from the RO to the evaporator, to the vacuum and tank levels…
    it would help if you were a little more specific in what type of monitoring system you were looking at.

    Assuming we’re talking remote vacuum monitoring:
    Pro’s- detects leaks and ice dams in the main lines.
    Con’s- Cost.

    Commercial systems, depending on the number of nodes needed, can quickly add up to significant cost.
    This cost can be offset by detecting leaks early and/or identifying ice dams or other problems that lead to inefficient vacuum transfer to dog fever taps downstream of the problem area.
    By identifying and eliminating these problems quickly, higher production yields can be obtained.

    Ever have a branch come down across a main?
    Ever ask yourself “Gee, wonder how long that’s been there?”
    The ice dam that inevitably forms beneath that branch can take hours to thaw.
    That’s time you’re not getting vacuum to taps downstream.
    Multiply by the number of days the branch went unnoticed.
    That’s the strongest argument I can make in favor of the system.

    How long does it take and how often do you walk your woods?
    If the answers are not long and daily, that would be an argument against.
    Well laid out, thanks!
    Last edited by Jamestheone85; 10-19-2018 at 12:07 PM.

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