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Thread: Maple Wine/Liquor

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Pulaski County, IN
    Posts
    16

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    I just started a 10 gallon batch. I took sweet left in the evaporator and added some syrup to it to get the sugar high enough. I wonder if any maple flavor would be left if it was distilled after fermentation?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Raymond, NH
    Posts
    332

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    I did the same thing as you achesser, and it came out really great and there is a hint of maple for sure. That was 3 years ago. The last 2 years, I tried it again and both times it failed to ferment completely. Just yesterday I started my 4th year attempt. I started out this time with some yeast nutrient added to give they yeast a kick start. Hopefully it'll do the trick and come out like my 1st (lucky) batch.
    Planning on 500 taps for 2018. 14x16 sugarhouse. Leader Patriot 2x6 w/hood. New to me MES 3-post Dolly gonna save me some long nights this year!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Pulaski County, IN
    Posts
    16

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    I have some yeast nutrient but did not think to put any in for some reason. I suppose I could take the air lock off and sprinkle some in. It is bubbling slowly now.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    19

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    My maple wine is already 1/2 way fermented after 5 days. Started at 1.105 on the hydrometer and
    its at 1.050 this morning.
    Been dropping about 20 points a day. Really vigorous fermentation.
    Adding some yeast energizer and nutrients daily plus stirring the gas out, only a 1/8 tsp of each daily.
    I suspect the maple syrup has a decent amount of minerals so not sure if adding nutrients is necessary
    but had some on hand.
    Its good to mix/dissolve any additions with a little water before adding to the must because if
    you just sprinkle it in it creates a lot of foaming.
    Backyard Sugarin' since 1991
    Concrete block arch on a 3' x 4' slab, 3 blocks high
    w/stovepipe and damper
    2' x 2' x 6" 16 ga. SS pan with drain valve
    5 gal. SS steamer pan for preheating
    20 7/16" spiles in mostly Sugar Maples
    89 Arctic Cat Panther sap hauler

    Making 2-3 gallons syrup most years.
    Maple Baked Beans
    Maple Oat Sourdough Bread
    4 gallons Maple Wine fermenting

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Northville
    Posts
    6

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    I have made three batches of the “maple wine”. The third, last years batch has been the best so far. I label them “maples mark” and “sugarbush surprise” (tm pending)

    Biggest problem has been what to call it: no honey so it’s not a mead: no grapes so it’s not wine: no distillation (yet) so it’s not vodka.

    I’ve done it two ways: the first was boiled to the SG I wanted and fermented. I used two different yeasts (lalvin 1087 and d47). The 1087 brew turned out like a sweet Riesling with more body and a deeper flavor. The d47 brew seemed to get pectin haze for some reason. It’s undrinkable: but I may distill it just to see what it ends up like.

    The third batch was boiled all the way to syrup then mixed with raw boiled sap until my s.g was reached. I step fed until the i was at 20% abv. Then added another stage to get enough sweetness to balance it out. It was HOT while young, but aged out to a very sweet dessert wine. Lots of bourbon character, and Smokey character, and a lot of sweetness. After one year of aging, the burn is gone. Very well received by my (possibly too polite friends). A very cultured co worker said it was very much like a sherry.

    I can post better notes if anyone is interested.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Chassell, MI
    Posts
    14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kawierider View Post
    I have made three batches of the “maple wine”. The third, last years batch has been the best so far. I label them “maples mark” and “sugarbush surprise” (tm pending)

    Biggest problem has been what to call it: no honey so it’s not a mead: no grapes so it’s not wine: no distillation (yet) so it’s not vodka.

    I’ve done it two ways: the first was boiled to the SG I wanted and fermented. I used two different yeasts (lalvin 1087 and d47). The 1087 brew turned out like a sweet Riesling with more body and a deeper flavor. The d47 brew seemed to get pectin haze for some reason. It’s undrinkable: but I may distill it just to see what it ends up like.

    The third batch was boiled all the way to syrup then mixed with raw boiled sap until my s.g was reached. I step fed until the i was at 20% abv. Then added another stage to get enough sweetness to balance it out. It was HOT while young, but aged out to a very sweet dessert wine. Lots of bourbon character, and Smokey character, and a lot of sweetness. After one year of aging, the burn is gone. Very well received by my (possibly too polite friends). A very cultured co worker said it was very much like a sherry.

    I can post better notes if anyone is interested.
    Dang, unlucky with the d47. My first batch of maple wine I used d47 with fully boiled syrup and it turned out great, just finished up it's mandatory year of aging and it turned out a lot like you described. Did you use pectic enzyme to take down the haze at all? Had a lot of heat going into the bottles, but it mellowed out significantly and is a great desert wine. Still has enough maple character that when I tried it with friends they all wanted more... and pancakes. Probably a bit on the sweeter side than I had intended, though I can claim it as a rookie mistake since it was my first homebrew!

    Love your names by the way. I went with The Sugar Shack Special for mine.

    Sugar Shack Special.jpg
    2015: 20 buckets on taps, two steam table pans on block arch, 4.5 gallons
    2016: 20 buckets on taps, two steam table pans on block arch, 6.5 gallons
    2017: 30 buckets on taps, 2x3' flat pan on block arch, 4.5 gallons (poor sap year!)
    2018: 38 buckets on taps, 2x3' flat pan on block arch, syrup TBD!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Farmington NY
    Posts
    8

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    I have not tried a a wine yet but I did make Bourbon. Bought a 5 litre oak barrel. Bought 5 litres of corn " Moonshine". Bourbon is 51% corn in first use white oak barrels. Filled the barrel with shine for 8 months. Tapped it for deer season and Christmas with excellent reviews. Next was 4 months of 2016 syrup. Came out great.
    Feb 2017 filled the barrel with the cheapest Rye whiskey I could find. Let the barrel do it's magic again and pulled it after 10 months for Christmas. This batch came out fantastic. 3 fingers, 2 ice cubes equals a happy hobbyist. Next,
    Filled with 2017 syrup. Tasting good after 2 months. The final batch will be vinegar made from homemade pear cider 3 years ago. Tough being patient, but it pays off. There are charts showing how many months in smaller barrels equal years in a 55 gal barrel.
    After visiting Wayne Gretzky's distillery in Niagara on the Lake in Canada I am working on a Maple Whiskey Cream Liquor. I am on my 3rd test run, and am getting close to a final recipe.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    hudson river valley
    Posts
    136

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    Kevinco,

    A popular thing in craft beers is aging a good imperial stout in a bourbon/maple barrel.

    Maybe that would be a good next step for your barrel.
    2017 Built 2x4 arch for a divided pan, 8.5 gallons from 30 taps increased to 42 taps during season.
    2016 Produced 3 gallons & 1 quart Syrup, Block arch & 3 buffet pans, 12 taps
    2015 Thought about tapping

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Ellenburg Center, NY
    Posts
    65

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    We make traditional wine in sweet or dry by fermenting exclusively with our very own maple syrup at Brandy Brook Maple Farm & Olde Tyme Winery. Currently, we have 14 varieties, but five are sold out until 2017 vintage is mature. Among those in stock are Red Rasperry, Apple, Blackberry, Concord, Rose, St. Pepin, Kaleidoscope (a fruit red), and Blueberry. Strawberry Rhubarb will be introduced for the first time near Mother's Day. Maple based wines are unique in both their taste and scent, with the integrity of the real fruit and grapes we use coming through in the wine. Maple based alcohols are starting to gain popularity in the marketplace. It is a great value added endeavor for our mid-size family maple farm
    We are open by appointment. Cheers!
    The sweetest trees are not always the oldest and the biggest...
    [url]www.facebook.com/oldetymewine
    www.facebook.com/brandybrookmaplefarm

    1999: 100 taps in one sugarbush
    2007: 2000 taps in one sugarbush
    2010: 7000 taps in 5 sugarbushes
    2014: 9000 taps in 6 sugarbushes
    2015: 9000 taps in 6 sugarbushes & 40 birch taps
    2016: 10,000 taps in 7 sugarbushes & a new winery
    2017: 10,000 taps in 5 sugar bushes & birch & WINE
    2018: 10,000 taps in 5 sugar bushes & birch & Wine

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