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Thread: November Journal

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    49

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    Nate, that gable end is just screaming for a maple leaf shaped sign or cut out. I love the live edge siding. Good luck with the rest of your build.

    Dave, glad that you got everything in place and stayed safe doing it. Turning trees or even putting trees down where I want them has eluded me. Something that I need to work on.
    Last edited by minehart gap; 11-14-2017 at 05:26 AM.
    Minehart Gap Maple
    2018:finally (after 27 years) got access to my sugar bush, planning 300 taps on 3/16 gravity to test the waters, Used 2x6 raised flue sap pan & 2x2 syrup pan, 600 & 250 gal ss bulk tank, Homemade arch, and lots of homemade gadgets, 14x18 timber frame sugar shack from the 1800’s
    Before 2018: played around at home with 10 to 15 taps and 5 gal. pots

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Oneida NY
    Posts
    7,665

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    Minehart, sign up for a Game Of Logging (GOL) course, levels 1 and 2. It is a great logger's training class, each is 1 day and well worth the cost and time. Before I took the course I had been cutting trees for firewood, both for my home use, my brother's and my parent's use along with selling firewood when my business had a slow spell for about 25 years. I did fairly well, after being taught by my father. Then I attended a 2 hour GOL mini demo at a maple training day. That spurred me to sign up for the course. At the course I learned a whole bunch about felling a tree safely, and techniques to make it safer. Cutting trees is inherently dangerous, but you can stack the odds in your favor by a huge amount by taking the GOL courses 1 &2. There are also levels 3 & 4 but they get into skidder use and log trucks and other big time equipment (so I hear, I never took 3 and 4).
    There is also a great U-tube video to watch by Husqvarna https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Teb2bQsqx44
    This is a great one to watch before you go out to cut any trees.
    However, the worst tree I talked about in my post above was so bad that the GOL training would have said "do not try" and certainly without an excavator (without which I would have had to make a road for a tree crane and then paid about $500-1000 to get it laid on the ground) to help and about 50 years experience that indicated to me that if I studied the situation and figured out the issues, I could do it and not get killed or have anyone else get hurt or worse. One thing I should have done but only thought of it after the fact, is that I should have strapped the tree trunk together, I have 4 HD binder straps that each would of gone around the tree 3 times and bound the trunk from splitting. I never thought of that until after the tree laid on the ground.
    I encourage you and all other members to first watch that video, and then sign up for a GOL training when one is offered in your area. I had to drive 2 hrs to get to mine, very well worth it. I think I paid about $75 for each level but that was back in 2005. As a side note, at the end of level 2 each student (there were maybe 10) is assigned a tree to cut. Most were about 14-16" DBH (diameter breast height). We had to put a stake in the ground where we were going to drop the tree, then we cut the tree. All assigned trees had a little lean away from where we had to drop it. We used wedges to get it to fall the right way. After the tree was down, each was measured to see who was the closest to their stake. The stakes were all out about 40' from the stump. My tree hit the stake and I won a very nice Husky loggers helmet/hard hat for getting the closest. In my class there were a couple of students who had never run a chainsaw, to others who were professional loggers, everyone came fairly close but no others hit their stake. I understand many insurance companies require all loggers to take the full series of GOL (4 levels) before they will insure a logger.
    Last edited by maple flats; 11-14-2017 at 08:24 AM.
    Dave Klish about 1320 taps in '15, down to about 700 in '16, up to 850 for 2018?
    2012 Mahindra 36 HP 4x4/ loader/cab/heat/AC:-)
    added a gooseneck equipment trailer and F350 to tow it to haul more sap
    3x8 raised flue evaporator
    250 GPH converted to electric, RO by Ray Gingerich
    6.32 KW solar system, 1.48KW is battery backed up, all net metered
    http://s1041.photobucket.com/albums/...anssugarhouse/
    website: www.daveandjoanssugarhouse.com

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Oneida NY
    Posts
    7,665

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    [QUOTE=minehart gap;337159] And how do you like the new storage shed? Is it too small yet? Mine always seem to be too small before I even start.

    It's still fairly empty, while I get a few other things done. The shed is in addition to a 12x16 I already had, plus 2 10x10's. I will out grow it in a year or 2. My plans are to get another the same size next year and set it about 12-16' away from this one, then join them and have my tractor storage under the roof between those two.
    Dave Klish about 1320 taps in '15, down to about 700 in '16, up to 850 for 2018?
    2012 Mahindra 36 HP 4x4/ loader/cab/heat/AC:-)
    added a gooseneck equipment trailer and F350 to tow it to haul more sap
    3x8 raised flue evaporator
    250 GPH converted to electric, RO by Ray Gingerich
    6.32 KW solar system, 1.48KW is battery backed up, all net metered
    http://s1041.photobucket.com/albums/...anssugarhouse/
    website: www.daveandjoanssugarhouse.com

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Center, Underhill Ctr, VT
    Posts
    3,639

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    Quote Originally Posted by maple flats View Post
    Minehart, sign up for a Game Of Logging (GOL) course, levels 1 and 2. It is a great logger's training class, each is 1 day and well worth the cost and time.
    I'll second that suggestion. It is required safety training for anyone who works with a chainsaw at UVM PMRC. Well worth the time and $.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

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