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Thread: Vacuum pump for the small producer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    New hampshire
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    Default Vacuum pump for the small producer

    Hey everyone. I have a releaser and am now looking for a vacuum pump. I have about 250 taps and don't want to spend the money on large scale pumps. I am looking in to some of the Robinair pumps. Has anyone tried any of the pumps I linked to. My only fear is that they might over heat. I believe they are rotary vane pumps

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...f_rd_i=desktop

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...f_rd_i=desktop

    Any help appreciated.
    2014-2017:3-300 taps, homemade evaporator
    2018: Planned 1500+ taps , 3x12 evaporator, 16x24 sugarhouse

  2. #2
    lpakiz Guest

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    For 250 taps and a reasonably tight system, don't overlook dairy pumps. I am using a Surge SP-11 (2 cylinder piston pump) on 180 taps and I can easily hold 26 inches, some days/periods I am at 27.5 HG.
    It is driven by a 79 cc Predator motor running approximately 1000 RPM with a 2 1/2 inch pulley. Havnt done the math, but I suspect we are turning the flywheel at 200 RPM or less.
    With a little patient searching, you might find the pump for $100. Beware, the vacuum tanks are sometimes rusted out in the bottom.
    Last edited by lpakiz; 05-23-2016 at 04:34 PM.

  3. #3
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    Hoosick Falls
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    other dairy pumps that will work well also are the delaval 73 & 75, univerals or boumatic M3 or M5, Mc cormick made a pump, the surge RV pumps are two generations prior to the sp series. BB was between the two series. The BB1 or BB2 will work just fine for you. The bb3 and 4 are just bigger and will work fine but will require arger motors and just have a higher fuel useage if running gas power plant or more watts if using the grid.

    Larger pumps can be spun at slower rpm and achieve the same cfms of a smaller pump. Some times a large pump can be owned for less money than a smaller pump. Unless it is a piston pump. These require designed speed to splash the cylinder walls to cool and lube the pistons and rings properly.

    Also in the surge there is the Alamo series that is newer and was made til around 2000. a 30 or 40 or and of the larger ( 60, 70 100+ units) will work fine.

    As lp[akiz said...patience and if you find a unit feel free to ask what she can do. My Delaval 73 runs 750 plus ladders and injectors on 750 taps. and holds 28+" the 75 was the standby pump.

    There are many other pumps that will do the job also like gast and lobe style pumps.

    Good Luck!

    Ben
    Last edited by BreezyHill; 05-23-2016 at 05:11 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Redwood NY
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    We have used a Harbor Freight 2.5 CFM pump similar to what you are looking at on 100 taps for two seasons and overheating was not an issue. It barely gets warm and consistently pulls 27-28 " of vacuum. Two factors to keep in mind is you need to drain the water out of the oil daily and you need to vent your exhaust away from you releaser and tank. They give of a lot of oil mist. We have purchased a gast 1550 to use for next season though. Looking to get more CFMs for our mechanical releaser.
    12 x 16 shack with 8 x 16 addition
    2 x 6 D&G raised flue with hood
    Homebuilt releasers
    220 taps on vac
    100 plus taps on buckets
    Gast 1550 on gas engine
    HF vac pump on generator

  5. #5
    lpakiz Guest

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    While I understand the logic for not running a piston pump too slow, or for that matter, a small air cooled gas engine, I have to say that I have put in excess of 500 hours per year on the SP-11 pump for 6 years now, turning it pretty darn slow. I use the spit/sizzle test that some members on the forum prescribes. If you spit on the cylinder head and it don't sizzle, you are good to go.
    Hope Breezy doesn't turn out to be right and next year is the year the pump or motor blows!! And I have nothing against a vane style dairy pump, i just have no xperience with them.
    Nothing personal Ben, just my experience so far.
    Last edited by lpakiz; 05-23-2016 at 08:31 PM.

  6. #6
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    No offense taken...this is a great spot to transfer knowledge. I would highly recommend an infared temp unit. Harbor freight is having their annual parking lot sale and they should be there for around $10.

    Sizzle is around 200 and up. I lost a pump at that level, so be careful.

  7. #7
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    May 2014
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    Default Vacuum pump for the small producer

    Quote Originally Posted by MT Pockets Producer View Post
    We have used a Harbor Freight 2.5 CFM pump similar to what you are looking at on 100 taps for two seasons and overheating was not an issue. It barely gets warm and consistently pulls 27-28 " of vacuum. Two factors to keep in mind is you need to drain the water out of the oil daily and you need to vent your exhaust away from you releaser and tank. They give of a lot of oil mist. We have purchased a gast 1550 to use for next season though. Looking to get more CFMs for our mechanical releaser.
    Thanks for the info. That's what im going to do. The 8cfm pump should be plenty for 250 taps on a releaser.how much oil did you go through in a season.
    2014-2017:3-300 taps, homemade evaporator
    2018: Planned 1500+ taps , 3x12 evaporator, 16x24 sugarhouse

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    UVM Proctor Maple Research Center, Underhill Ctr, VT
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    Quote Originally Posted by MT Pockets Producer View Post
    We have used a Harbor Freight 2.5 CFM pump similar to what you are looking at on 100 taps for two seasons and overheating was not an issue.
    Just be aware that this pump is not rated for continuous duty, so even though it has not yet heated up doesn't mean that it won't some day under certain conditions. So keep it a safe distance away from combustible materials.

    They give of a lot of oil mist.
    That is quite true. You might consider a small oil mist filter on the top of the unit.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

  9. #9
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    Jan 2015
    Location
    Redwood NY
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    About a quart of oil per season, maybe a touch more. That's with it running while temps were above freezing and into the night as long as the generator would run on a tank of fuel. Dr. Tim raises a good point about not being continuous duty so they would have the potential to fail at any point. We piped our exhaust into a piece of 1" pvc pipe to a plastic container and collected the oil mist.
    12 x 16 shack with 8 x 16 addition
    2 x 6 D&G raised flue with hood
    Homebuilt releasers
    220 taps on vac
    100 plus taps on buckets
    Gast 1550 on gas engine
    HF vac pump on generator

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Center, Underhill Ctr, VT
    Posts
    5,393

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    I should have added that these are not bad little pumps overall, and will pull decent vacuum. We use them in the lab when we're testing something before deploying equipment into the woods. Keeps us from having to fire up the big pumps.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

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