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Thread: What's everyone's opinion on the 3/16 line?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    New york
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    18

    Default What's everyone's opinion on the 3/16 line?

    We are looking to try out 3/16 line. We are just looking for some feed back. What works best?


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Waterford Maine
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    We tried it this year and was very impressed by it. We will be putting out more for next season.

  3. #3
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    Jan 2014
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    Upstate NY
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    I think it is amazing! In one bush with 275 taps we got 7000 gallons of sap. That is 25 gallons per tap. So impressed.

  4. #4
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    Apr 2016
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    New york
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    Quote Originally Posted by KReinisch View Post
    I think it is amazing! In one bush with 275 taps we got 7000 gallons of sap. That is 25 gallons per tap. So impressed.
    What was your overall drop? And how far did it drop after your last tap to the tank?

  5. #5
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    Jan 2014
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    It varied from lateral... Most of them had a least a 30-50 drop from top to bottom. I had a few that had around 75ft drop. I had anywhere from 10-25 taps on a line. I did by best to do the 30 foot of tubing after last tap but there were a few where I just could pass a healthy tree up. The lines with over 15 taps produced like made.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin, Spring Valley
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    2016 was our first year with 3/16 tubing and out of 900 taps we produced 550 gallons of syrup.Last year out of 800 plus taps on 5/16 tubing we produced 110 gallons of syrup.Have about 25 tree's max on each lateral,first one's closest to mainline may only have 5-10 feet of drop while last tree on that lateral maybe 75'or better of elevation.Some of them lateral runs are 300' to 400' long.Some people seem concerned with them getting plugged with gunk,which I can understand.This year we had no problem.When we pulled our taps the line drained real nice.Went and took a look at it last week and lines all looked great no mold or gunk in the ones we checked. Everyday when the sap started running we walked the mainline and checked each lateral to see if sap was flowing,you could see it racing down the lateral into the mainline. Next year when we tap I'am sure we will have to keep a close watch for plugs and if we have any we will have to correct it.Might seem like a lot of monkeying around but the woods is were you start to make your syrup.We had times this season were it didn't freeze for three nights with day time temps in the 60's and they still produced about a gallon of sap per tap,were the year before on 5/16 they would hardly produce any or quit all together.Nothing is fool proof,if you think you can tap it,set it and forget it,it don't work that way with any system.

    Sap Hauler
    -1996 Ford F250
    -2003 Yamaha Grizzly 660
    2016 Year:About 925 Taps on 3/16
    2015 Year:About 775 Taps
    2014 Year:About 270 Taps
    2013 Year:About 265 Taps
    2012 Year:About 200 Taps
    2011 Year:About 200 Taps
    2010 Year:About 65 Taps

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    UVM Proctor Maple Research Center, Underhill Ctr, VT
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    5,006

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    Everyone should also keep in mind that if you put up new 3/16" tubing last year you got two very beneficial effects. The first is vacuum, which can double your sap yield. The second is excellent sanitation, which will again greatly increase your yield. The two effects (vacuum and sanitation) are additive, so you get more by doing both.

    In order to keep this going, you've got to do two things. First, make sure that there are no plugs or leaks in the tubing next year so you can again achieve high vacuum. Second, be sure to either use a new spout (good) and replace drops every 3-4 years, or use a CV spout (better). This will maintain good taphole sanitation and help to ensure your yields stay high.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin, Spring Valley
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrTimPerkins View Post
    Everyone should also keep in mind that if you put up new 3/16" tubing last year you got two very beneficial effects. The first is vacuum, which can double your sap yield. The second is excellent sanitation, which will again greatly increase your yield. The two effects (vacuum and sanitation) are additive, so you get more by doing both.

    In order to keep this going, you've got to do two things. First, make sure that there are no plugs or leaks in the tubing next year so you can again achieve high vacuum. Second, be sure to either use a new spout (good) and replace drops every 3-4 years, or use a CV spout (better). This will maintain good taphole sanitation and help to ensure your yields stay high.
    My thoughts exactly.One thing I noticed this year when we pulled taps all the tap holes were clean looking ,but our system was all new too.Plan on all new spouts next year.Love watching them tree's pumping the sap out.

    Sap Hauler
    -1996 Ford F250
    -2003 Yamaha Grizzly 660
    2016 Year:About 925 Taps on 3/16
    2015 Year:About 775 Taps
    2014 Year:About 270 Taps
    2013 Year:About 265 Taps
    2012 Year:About 200 Taps
    2011 Year:About 200 Taps
    2010 Year:About 65 Taps

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Merrill, Wi
    Posts
    345

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    On aging 3/16 what are your thoughts on adding vac to pull some of the gunk out of the lines.

    I am dabbling with the idea of running 3/16 on a relatively flat piece of property with vac. Does anyone know if there is research out there that would support this? I had difficulty finding any. The land in question has only 20ft in drop over 40 acres from a cost saving perspective 3/16 would be a good option but I am not sure if it would work based on the research.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Center, Underhill Ctr, VT
    Posts
    5,006

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Maple Man 85 View Post
    On aging 3/16 what are your thoughts on adding vac to pull some of the gunk out of the lines.
    If you are able to do this, it would likely help to prevent plugging.

    I am dabbling with the idea of running 3/16 on a relatively flat piece of property with vac.
    3/16" tubing is counter-indicated on flat land due to the build up of back-pressure, which results in a loss of yield. It would be less problematic with vacuum, but still probably not a good idea. In this particular case, saving a little money might cost you more (in lost sap) than you think.
    Dr. Tim Perkins
    UVM Proctor Maple Research Ctr
    http://www.uvm.edu/~pmrc
    https://mapleresearch.org
    Timothy.Perkins@uvm.edu

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