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Thread: Source for 5+ Year Old Sugar Maple Trees - Where to Buy?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northwood NH
    Posts
    10

    Default Source for 5+ Year Old Sugar Maple Trees - Where to Buy?

    Looking into the future to replace some dyeing 100+ year old sugars as well some that have been lost over the years along our family's stone wall. Unfortunately there are not many in the woods. Would like to get some 5yr old or even 10yr old to get a jump start to get me closer to 30yr for tapping.

    I see local Tractor Supply and online sources for 5ft tall for $20 for Acer saccharum.

    Are there local programs, grants, etc that might help with this? We're in New Hampshire so haven't checked with local extension office yet.
    __________________
    Buoy Chaser (Summer Slalom Water Skier who "Chases Buoys" with the Family)
    2010 & Prior - Always wanted to make maple syrup.
    2011 - First attempt with 24 taps, old galvanized buckets with lids, 51000 Btu/hr Propane Turkey Fryer with 34 Qty Stainless Stock Pot, 8 gallons of sap in 1st 7hrs, Syrup ????

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northwood NH
    Posts
    10

    Default 1ft (height growth) and 0.2in (diameter growth) annually 1st 30yrs

    Found this great tidbit to age younger trees.

    http://maple.dnr.cornell.edu/pubs/trees.htm

    Sugar maple trees average about 1 foot of height growth and 0.2 inch of diameter growth annually for the first 30 to 40 years. Hence a 30-year-old tree might be 6 to 8 inches in diameter and 30 to 35 feet in height. After about 140 to 150 years, height growth ceases and radial growth slows greatly. Although rare, old-growth sugar maple stands can average 300 to 400 years in age; individual trees range from 70 to 110 feet tall with diameters at breast height of 20 to 36 inches.
    __________________
    Buoy Chaser (Summer Slalom Water Skier who "Chases Buoys" with the Family)
    2010 & Prior - Always wanted to make maple syrup.
    2011 - First attempt with 24 taps, old galvanized buckets with lids, 51000 Btu/hr Propane Turkey Fryer with 34 Qty Stainless Stock Pot, 8 gallons of sap in 1st 7hrs, Syrup ????

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northwood NH
    Posts
    10

    Default Arbor Day - $8 for 4ft root or $11 for 4ft potted

    Best deal I've been able to find online.

    http://www.arborday.org/shopping/tre...tail.cfm?ID=14

    Item # 1004 (Roots)
    Tree Size: Standard
    Shipping Height: 3' - 4'
    *Mem. Price:$7.98 Reg. Price:$12.00

    Item # 4371 (Potted)
    Tree Size: Standard
    Shipping Height: 3' - 4'
    *Mem. Price:$10.98 Reg. Price:$16.50

    Sugar Maple
    Acer saccharum

    Landscape Standout
    Brilliant Fall Colors turning yellow, orange, and red
    Deer Resistant: Seldom Severely Damaged
    Grows 60' to 75' high with 40 to 50' spread
    Zones 3 to 8
    Can't Ship to: AK, AZ, HI
    __________________
    Buoy Chaser (Summer Slalom Water Skier who "Chases Buoys" with the Family)
    2010 & Prior - Always wanted to make maple syrup.
    2011 - First attempt with 24 taps, old galvanized buckets with lids, 51000 Btu/hr Propane Turkey Fryer with 34 Qty Stainless Stock Pot, 8 gallons of sap in 1st 7hrs, Syrup ????

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Freedom
    Posts
    3

    Default

    http://www.porkyfarm.com/sugar.asp




    Don't know about shipping

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tewksbury, MA
    Posts
    69

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuoyChaser View Post
    Looking into the future to replace some dyeing 100+ year old sugars as well some that have been lost over the years along our family's stone wall.
    I've transplanted at least 30 sugar maples that were growing too thickly along one of my stone walls. None had less than 4"-5" bole. All have survived nicely as open grown trees, but one died after 15 years and three were removed for hi-way redesign. The remaining are now tapable. If I had planted seedlings or whips, they would have never developed into tapable trees in my remaining life time.

    I fabricated a scoop from a 8' diameter 1/2" wall tank. I attached it to a large (15 ton) forklift and popped the trees out with one stab. A big loader would have worked as well. A truck mounted tree spade is quick too. Unless you have alot of patience, think about planting big trees that are free.
    Last edited by Wardner in Tewksbury; 05-08-2011 at 01:48 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Canton, NY
    Posts
    213

    Default

    If you are looking at trees at TRactor Supply check out where they were grown. The ones at the local store all came from a nursery in Tennessee. I don't know about you but I want trees that I know have survived a Northeast winter or 2.
    Ian
    New sugarhouse fall '06. 3x8 drop flue by Phaneuf. Kubota L2800. 260 buckets for 2012. 320 buckets & 184 on tubing for 2013. 320 buckets, 207 on 5/16" and 200 on 3/16" gravity tubing for 2014. Selling the extra sap.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    illinois
    Posts
    378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuoyChaser View Post
    Looking into the future to replace some dyeing 100+ year old sugars as well some that have been lost over the years along our family's stone wall. Unfortunately there are not many in the woods. Would like to get some 5yr old or even 10yr old to get a jump start to get me closer to 30yr for tapping.

    I see local Tractor Supply and online sources for 5ft tall for $20 for Acer saccharum.

    Are there local programs, grants, etc that might help with this? We're in New Hampshire so haven't checked with local extension office yet.
    We put in 150 maples from the USDA program they were about a dollar and 80 cents each with the use of the tree planter. they then provided replacement trees after the first year.
    I have found the deer pick on the maples more than any other tree we have planted seems to be a second choice for the beavers

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lucas, Ohio
    Posts
    16

    Default transplanting trees?

    What do you folks do when transplanting trees on you property to give them the best chance of survival? A friend of mine says that he has the best luck transplanting them in March.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    South Lincoln,vermont
    Posts
    1,777

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wardner in Tewksbury View Post
    I've transplanted at least 30 sugar maples that were growing too thickly along one of my stone walls. None had less than 4"-5" bole. All have survived nicely as open grown trees, but one died after 15 years and three were removed for hi-way redesign. The remaining are now tapable. If I had planted seedlings or whips, they would have never developed into tapable trees in my remaining life time.

    .
    I have to disagree, I have 2 hard maple trees in my front yard that I planted from saplings that I pulled out of the ground across the road from my place. I planted one of them 24 years ago and it was about a 1/2 in diameter and 6 feet tall it is now 45 inches in circumference or 15 inches at breast height. The second was about the same, but I planted it 16 years ago and now is 34 inches in circumference or about 11 inches in diameter. I fertilized them every year for about 5 years and maybe 2 times since with 10-10-10 fertilizer and watered them alot the first year. I could tap both of them now if I wanted. I would just talk to a neighbor and see if he had some to dig or even your own land. I have found that a sapling will catch on and grow much faster then a big tree will nearly everytime. I also planted some at a local town office with the same results and they didn't cost anything.

    I most always transplant when they are dormant
    Success is not final,failure is not fatal.It is courage to continue that really counts


    Sugared for fifty years and still the newbies know more then me

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    southern ontario
    Posts
    118

    Default Fall works too

    I transplanted 20 or so six foot saplings in the fall of 2000 from our woods and they are doing great. For the first three years you must water them if the weather turns dry to get the roots established and put stakes up to support them as they are spindly. They are around 16 to 18 feet high now and nicely filled out. My neighbour planted some in 1989 and he put his first taps in this year. You won't regret doing this if you look after them for the first few years.
    New in 2010:
    18 x 48 D&G
    15 x 13 shack
    52 buckets
    In 2011:
    68 buckets

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